Cut, cut, CUT

I’m not sure I’ve crafted a set or mixtape in the past couple of years that didn’t include a Supercut, and I bandy the term around liberally. But its typically met with blank looks, or the digital equivalent: internet silence. So what is a Supercut?

Supercut: noun \ˈsü-pər-kət\ — A fast-paced montage of short video clips that obsessively isolates a single element from its source, usually a word, phrase, or cliche from film and TV.

Got that? Ok, here you go, here’s your basic Supercut, every Christmas from 90210…

You’re probably like “So what?”

Well much as I genuinely enjoy that last number, Supercuts come into their own when they rampage across the silver screen, creating new meanings from old.

How about the atmospheric suspense of endless cinematic waits (from Swede Mason, the guy who brought you the now legendary “Buttery Biscuit Base”)…

Or, in a similar vein, tumbling tumbleweeds by Duncan Robson

I mentioned previously how much I enjoy interstitial material in my sets, the bits in between the other bits. The Supercut is THE perfect interstitial material. Its typically familiar to the audience, so it holds their attention in a way that precisely pixelated naked women also do. Plus, its a great bridge to jump from one element of the set to another.

Now quite where your Supercut ends and the remix or mashup begins is an ecumenical matter, but I for one love it when friend of the blog Matthijs Vlot sequences elements together to create a new narrative structure. What do I mean?…

I cant finish without a hat tip to Andy Baio (aka @waxpancake) for both coining the term Supercut and creating the definitive online archive: Supercut.org

Nor can I leave without paying homage to the master of the cut, Alfred Hitchcock, who elucidates on the montage editing technique with super acluity in the opening of this short interview…